CropCow gender workshops, KalSel

Women’s gender Focus Group Discussion participants and researchers, Tanah Laut, KalSel, August 2019.  Photo: Rene Villano

Women’s gender Focus Group Discussion participants and researchers, Tanah Laut, KalSel, August 2019. Photo: Rene Villano

In August, the CropCow gender research team held their first Focus Group Discussions (FGDs). The team also met in Lombok to plan gender research across the various objectives of the CropCow project.

These activities were an opportunity for the team to welcome Dr Stella Thei (pictured above) from UNRAM. Dr Thei was briefed in detail about the gender components of the CropCow project, and will act as coordinator of gender research and training.

Men’s gender Focus Group Discussion participants and researchers, Tanah Laut, KalSel, August 2019.  Photo: Rene Villano

Men’s gender Focus Group Discussion participants and researchers, Tanah Laut, KalSel, August 2019. Photo: Rene Villano

Impressions of FGD and gender research

Several participants in the women’s and men’s FGDs held in KalSel gave their impressions of the FGD data collection approach and gender research across IndoBeef to Field Officer Ms Ridhona Edriantina.

These impressions will help the team develop their research methodology and research questions to the specific circumstances of project sites in KalSel.

  • Mr Hamdan (BPTP-KalSel) noted that FGDs were different to data collection traditionally undertaken by BPTP-KalSel, which involved either one to one data collection at a village, or more formal group activities which resemble ‘a class’. In contrast, he noted that the FGD collected more diverse information.

  • Dr Nuru Dewi Yanti (ULM) discovered that patience was key in facilitating an FGD which is attended by participants from a range of backgrounds (different villages, personal characteristics and ethnicities).

  • Dr Eni Siti Rohaeni (BPTP-NTB) noted that it was important for sufficient FGDs to be held so that all relevant points of view are captured in the discussion, particularly in more diverse villages where more than one FGD may be beneficial.

  • Dr Ika Sumantri (ULM) came to realise as a result of participating in the FGDs how beneficial this research methodology is in collecting relevant information. He did note, however, that FGDs require considerable time to plan thoroughly to maximise the quality of information collected.

  • Ms Ridhona Edriantina (CropCow Field Officer) learned a lot about FGD organisation and facilitation, but also about the meaning of gender research, including the different roles of women and men, issues of equality and what may cause gender inequalities in the farming context.